Have You Gone for a Walk Lately?


I’ve been taking some of my friends on a walk that starts in Clifton, runs through Camp Washington, and then returns to Clifton.
This is something people don’t even think to do – and that makes sense. You couldn’t even make this walk a few years ago, but FOUR RECENT CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS made walking from Clifton to Camp Washington and back a breeze, allowing you to snake through in way you never would have imagined before all the construction.
It’s actually remarkably how quickly the walk goes, which begins in the Gaslight District, dumps you off on Central Parkway, and then sends you into Camp Washington. This is a good walk because, along with getting some exercise, the scenery changes the entire time.
Our journey begins at the corner of Clifton Avenue and Dixmyth – right by Good Samaritan Hospital. That “multi-use path” is new, and it’s a good way to start your walk.

Where the walk begins. at the corner of Clifton and Dixmyth – right by Good Samaritan Hospital                                                                                                                                                       Dixmyth takes you to Martin Luther King, at which point you take a right – and again you find yourself on a new walkway.

Turn right at Martin Luther King

Turning right on Martin Luther King sends you down a new walkway that ultimately takes you to Central Parkway

While walking down Martin Luther King, you have the option of crossing the Hopple Street Viaduct – which you can do, but it is’t safe – or veering right and exploring a new path that involves two back-to-back turns, and Voila!, you’re on Central Parkway.

If you take a right on Central Parkway and then walk until you reach the first light, you’ll be at Monmouth. If you take a left at Monmouth, you can walk over that bridge, which now has sidewalks on both sides due to construction that has taken place within the last few years.

The intersection of Central Parkway and Monmouth – take a left over that bridge.

Once you’re in Camp Washington, there’s lots to see and do. There’s Valley Park to your left, and Camp Washington Urban Farm.

Valley Park
Camp Washington Urban Farm

If you stay on Monmouth, you’ll run into the Sign Museum, which is highly entertaining – nostalgic humorous, colorful. Those are the current hours the you see on the sign.


Monmouth ends at Spring Grove Avenue, which, if you turn left, runs you past the Rhinegeist warehouse and some old factories, some defunct, some not – very picturesque in an industrial way.
I don’t always walk all the way to Spring Grove, though. Often I turn left at Colerain, where there’s more industrial scenery that includes old factories that are still operating as well as some buildings where the windows have been bricked up. I often stop to grab a coffee at Mom ‘n ’em at 3128 Colerain Avenue and continue until you geto the intersection of Colerain Avenue and Hopple Street, an intersection that is famous due to all the chilli that has been consumed there over the years.

The Intersection of Colerain Avenue and Hopple Street

I don’t recommend crossing the Hopple Street viaduct to return to Clifton – it’s a bit dicey, whereas the Monmouth bridge and intersection crossing Central Parkway are both safe. Once you’re back on Central Parkway, I recommend turning left and walking until you reach Clifton Hills Avenue, taking a right there, taking another right at Ludlow Avenue – and you know where to go from there.

It’s a nice, quick walk that’s very picturesque, and the scenery keeps changing – there’s plenty of natural beauty,  you’ll see old warehouses and factories, houses, stores, a motel that may or may not be on life support, a school that’s undergoing renovation, etc., etc., etc. It sounds like a longer walk than it is, and  you fly through the first part because you’re going downhill. The only time you walk uphill is after you turn right on Clifton Hills Avenue to get back to Clifton – but by then you’ll be looking forward to visiting Ludlow Avenue to do some shopping.

 

Apartments for Rent Near the University of Cincinnati

Are you hoping to rent an apartment near the University of Cincinnati? If so, contact Gaslight Property, a family-owned rental company with deep roots in the Clifton community and an office in the Gaslight District. Gaslight Property has apartment buildings and rental homes all over Clifton, Corryville, and University Heights, which are neighborhoods close to UC.

To get specific information about apartments near the University of Cincinnati, visit Gaslight Company’s user-friendly website, which can tell you all of the apartments available within a specific neighborhood. Three of the neighborhoods listed on the website are located close to the University of Cincinnati:

Clifton-Gaslight District

Clifton-Corryville

University-Clifton Heights

Just click this link to begin your search:

https://www.gaslightproperty.com/find-a-property

You can also specify the size of your apartment, as Gaslight Property rents anything from a studio apartment to six-bedroom apartments. Gaslight Property also rents entire houses, and it’s pet-friendly.

To talk to a leasing specialist today, call 513.861.600. We’ll set you up with someone who focuses on rental units that match your needs, whether you wish to rent an apartment near the University of Cincinnati or in another part of the city.

Buying Personal Protective Equipment and Cleaning Supplies on Ludlow Avenue

Do most people who live in or around the Gaslight District know how much is available in the way of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and cleaning supplies? Probably not. Fortunately three Ludlow Avenue stores stock everything you need to keep your residence and workplace clean and to protect you from the spread of Covid-19 both inside and outside.

The store some people overlook is Ace Hardware. It turns out Ace has gone out of its way to stock the store with everything you need for this period. Among other things, Ace Hardware sells the following products:

Face Masks. Ace Hardware sells both individual masks and ten packs.

These cotton face masks are for sale at the checkout counter at Ace Hardware. The employee told me these were all the way around the best mask out there – and in fact, it was the one she was wearing.

Face Shields.

Rubbing Alcohol.

Hydrogen Peroxide.

Cleaning Supplies, including products like Fantastik All Purpose Cleaner Liquid and disinfectant wipes.

Disposable Gloves.

Shoe Covers. Shoe covers are now considered Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) due to their Covid-resistant qualities.

Safety Glasses.

CVS also sells many of these above-mentioned items, including masks, rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, hand sanitizer, cleaning products, and cleaning wipes. Much to their credit, they go out of their to keep everything stocked. This was the image that greeted me when I walked into the store on Monday morning:

And there’s also Clifton Market. An employee told me today that the store stocks as many items as it can for cleaning, including Lysol, hand sanitizers, and cleaning wipes, but they sell out very quickly.

Overall, it sounds like Ace Hardware is the closest thing we have to untapped resource for handling  this situation.

The pandemic has been a challenge, but our businesses have done an excellent job of facing that challenge.  Their commitment to community is why we’re happy to support these businesses.

 

Keeping the Gaslight District Safe During the Pandemic

Keeping the Gaslight District Safe During the Pandemic  – Part 1: Food

Clifton has been challenged due to the pandemic that threw a curve ball into the year 2020.

The businesses in the heart of the Gaslight District are facing a particularly bumpy road.  Our shops and restaurants need to keep employees and customers safe while still earning enough money to keep their doors open, and this is no easy task.

Fortunately small businesses in the neighborhood have done a great job of responding to this challenge. That includes the restaurants and other food-based businesses that have worked hard to ensure safety for their customers as well as their employees.

 Clifton Market. Since the lockdown began, Clifton Market has been such a safe place for people to buy groceries that it has pulled in plenty of new shoppers who have witnessed the lack of safety measures in other grocery stores. The employees all wear masks, store social-distancing measure are in place (including Plexiglas windows and clear-cut signs). The Market also provides disposable gloves for those patrons who wish to use them.

The Market has set aside Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 8am to 10am as shopping times for customers more vulnerable to the virus. During these periods only seniors or people with underlying health conditions can shop in the Market. On top of that, Clifton Market offers delivery service to at-risk customers.

The majority of the people who shop at Clifton Market wear masks, but yesterday an employee of the Market told me that the store has masks they will offer to customers who walk in without one. The masks won’t be there for you to grab when you walk in, but you will be asked to wear one if you start walking around without one.

Say hi to Hillary Williams the next time you are eating at Clifton Plaza. During lunch and dinner hours she cleans everything off between visitors and helps ensure that proper social distancing measures are taken. And she with her warm smile she helps set a positive vibe for the plaza.

 Outdoor Seating. The Clifton Community, LLC (a joint venture between Clifton Town Meeting and the Clifton Business & Professional Association) has gone out of its way to provide outdoor seating so people can order carryout on and near Ludlow Avenue and have a nearby place to eat. At Clifton Plaza, seating has been added that allows for social distancing, and CBPA hired Hillary to help keep things clean and cheerful for guests. The benches at Telford Avenue serve a similar purpose, allowing people to eat outdoors (plus you can dine next to William Shakespeare). Another outdoor choice would be the benches surrounding Diggs Fountain at the corner of Clifton and Ludlow.


The Rooftop. When it opened, Clifton Bar and Grill’s rooftop offered a picturesque scenario for drinking and dining, but the fact that it’s outdoors provides an added safety element, as is also the case with the Plexiglas dividers they installed between tables, their mask policy, and their readily available hand sanitizer. We should also mention here that at Ludlow Garage the doors are often open, which is closer to eating outdoors, and a similar scenario exists when the huge windows are opened at Clifton Bar and Grill. Outdoor ventilation means the virus is less likely to spread.


Walk-up Windows. Ludlow Avenue has a couple businesses with walk-up windows, which, along with being convenient, add an extra layer of safety to food service. The Whole Bowl at 364 Ludlow Avenue serves tasty vegetarian food. You can call the new bakery, Ardor Bakeshop, at 272 Ludlow Avenue.

Did you know about Ambar India? Ambar India has seating behind the restaurant.

Don’t Forget About Arlin’s. Arlin’s has always had outdoor seating, and they serve food.

Finally, I should mention that I’ve ordered carryout at pretty much every restaurant on Ludlow Avenue, and the proper protocol has consistently been followed in regard to the virus.

MAYA Offering Special Promotions Online at jewelrymaya.com


For the time being, some retail storefronts in the Gaslight District have no store hours. Many of those stores remain open online, however, and some are holding special promotions. MAYA  currently has several online promotions to choose from,  including deals connected with Mother’s Day on May 10. The jewelry store is currently offering free shipping anywhere in the US.  Also, when requested, MAYA will make free deliveries to homes within 15 miles of the store.

The store’s Mother’s Day promotions also include the following offers through May 3:
40% off on everything with  a minimum purchase.
$10 off on purchases of $40 or more.
$50 off on purchases of $150 or more.

These special offers are available online. Also, you can call or text to Victor with any questions or special requests at 513-667-9299. Here are photographs of some of the lovely jewelry MAYA has for sale. To see more, and to take advantage of their special offers, visit their website at jewelrymaya.com.

MAYA has been part of the Gaslight District’s flora and fauna for the last four years, and the community embraced the new store immediately. The owner, Victor Morales, has been in the jewelry business for almost 20 years, but the lineage of MAYA goes back farther, all the way to his ancestors, who were native Mayans from Guatemala – hence the name MAYA.

MAYA’s jewelry is handmade and authentic; in other words, their designs are original and made by the real creators and artists they represent. From the start MAYA focused on handmade Native American jewelry from Zuni Pueblo and Navajo artists along with Sterling Silver jewelry by Mexican artists and designers. Later the store introduced more art and crafts in order to add color and charm to the store. The jewelry and crafts showcased at MAYA are all handmade by artists Victor has known for more than 20 years. The store’s jewelry and crafts collection varies from traditional styles to more contemporary and very stylish pieces.

Other MAYA links include:
Emails: maya@jewelrymaya.com
Facebook: facebook.com/jewelrybymaya/
Instagram: instagram.com/jewelry_maya/

We’ll have updates soon on some of the other stores in the Gaslight District who have also shifted their focus to online sales during the pandemic.

The Signs of Clifton

With well over 400 blog entries posted over eight-plus years, Gaslight Property has become an online history book of things that have endured and things that have changed.
And the photos in this blog entry definitely chronicle change. Due to the coronavirus, restaurants in the Gaslight District have completely switched over to carryout and delivery. It’s short term, but the neighborhood is very different, and very quiet.
On the positive side, the restaurants have shown tremendous resilience and the neighborhood has supported the restaurants, which will help to ensure that all of these small business will remain when we wake up on the other side of this.
While compiling a blog entry giving hours, addresses, contact information, and delivery options, I took photographs that helped me with the blog.
But I’m also making those signs their own blog entry. We could see them as depressing, but when everything reopens we will see these handmade signs as a testament to the resilience and support that make Clifton such a great neighborhood. We can get do this, and we will.

Clifton Market Celebrates Its Third Anniversary This Week

Clifton Market celebrates its third anniversary this week, and the neighborhood of Clifton celebrates with it.

On Sunday, January 22, 2017 the grocery store in the same location where IGA had been for decades.

Opening Clifton Market helped pave the way for other new businesses on the street, including Gaslight Bar & Grill, Torn Light Records, Sitwell’s Coffeehouse Act II, and the Ludlow Garage.

Last year Gurmukh Singh purchased the building and assets of Clifton Market. He quickly established a rapport with the community, and he’s done a great job so far.

To give a little perspective on what the reaction was after the store opened, peruse this blog entry written right after the store opened.  This is what a neighborhood feels like, the headline announced – and everyone who lives in Clifton knows what that means.

 

 

 

 

Ludlow Avenue In Pictures – A Magical History Tour

Recently I’ve set out to find old photographs of Ludlow Avenue, the Clifton Gaslight Business District, and the Gaslight District in general. Mostly I’ve been searching for photos of storefronts that have changed over the years, either due to cosmetic changes or new businesses replacing old ones. I feel as if I’m just scratching the surface so far, but I figured I’d trot out some photos just to get things started. As more photos become available, I’ll keep adding to this blog entry and perhaps create new blog entries that are narrower in focus. I encourage anyone who has photos (or knows where I can find more) to add to this collection to contribute. Eventually I suspect this will become a separate page on Gaslight Property’s website, gaslightproperty.com. These are some of the photos I’ve collected thus far. At first I was going to write a caption for each one – but after posting them I thought, it’ll be more fun for people to suss out where these locations are. So can you identify all the locations from the past and the businesses/spaces that have replaced them? And can you add some photos to the collection? In any case, enjoy this soon-to-be-expanded magical history tour.

 

 

New Hours for Gaslight Gourmet Cookies

It’s been almost three years since Gaslight Gourmet Cookies opened in Clifton, and it was an immediate hit, its baked goods, classic awning, and walk-up window adding that much more charm to the neighborhood. Along with serving walk-in or walk-up fans of cookies, macaroons, and coffee, the store has always had its share of loyal large-order customers, and demand is so strong in that area that it recently opted to trim its hours to be able to fulfill that need. So plan accordingly, cookie fans: new hours for the store, which is located at 272 Ludlow Avenue, are:

Wednesday: 7am to 4pm

Saturday: 7am to 6pm

Sunday: 8am to noon

When I spoke to the owner of the store, Tom Jacobsen, he said coconut macaroons are the most popular item on the menu, and it turns out they earned a “Best of the City” award in Cincinnati Magazine. The best-selling cookie is the dark cherry cordial cookie. When you speak to Tom, he makes it clear that the store is located in the perfect spot. “Clifton is the best neighborhood in the city,” he said, “and it’s been the best neighborhood for 100 years.”

And his civic pride extends to other Cincinnati neighborhoods. Tom donates cookies and macaroons for fund-raisers at St. Boniface, Fairview-Clifton German Language School, Roger Bacon, Elder, DePaul Christo Rey, and other local schools.

And if you’re wondering how to arrange large orders yourself, Tom encourages interested parties to text, all, or leave a message at (513) 602-5253. Also, you should check out his facebook page. Gaslight Gourmet Cookies is one more reason the Gaslight District is a great neighborhood and a great place to rent.

The Proud Rooster Keeps Crowing


An old-school mom-and-pop restaurant in the heart of the Gaslight District, the Proud Rooster has been getting a lot of attention lately. It recently topped a list of recommended mom-and-pops on the Only In Your State website. And last week 94.9’s Sandy and Holly “DJ’s and Diners” tour made its first stop at the Proud Rooster.

The praise is well-deserved, as the Proud Rooster, located at 345 Ludlow Avenue, provides good diner food and the kind of casual charm that befits a family-owned restaurant that’s been an integral part of Clifton’s Gaslight District since Eisenhower was President. (Before that, it was the Hitching Post.) The Proud Rooster is open for breakfast and lunch, and the hours are 8am to 2:30pm Tuesday thru Saturday and 8am to 1:30pm Sundays; it’s closed on Mondays. It serves breakfast staples like eggs, bacon, sausage, and home fries; lunch items include burgers, fries, and fried chicken.

The Proud Rooster has a relaxed vibe, and in the mornings you’ll see plenty of half-awake morning customers rolling in wearing shorts or sweats. While there, you’ll also see lots of sports memorabilia on the walls—photos of Bob Huggins, Sam Wyche, and other well-known coaches. And you’ll see photos and trophies of basketball teams once coached by the owner of the Proud Rooster, Bob “Chicken Man” Doll, who coached girls’ basketball for 28 years at St. Dominic in Delhi. The team won three city tournaments and were runners-up three other years.

When I asked Bob what he loved most about coaching, he said, “To see kids believe in themselves.” The work was all volunteer, and he made it clear that the benefits of playing sports—and his connection with the students—extended well beyond the end of the season.

“People say, ‘I don’t know if I can do that, I’m gonna quit”—well, that’s too easy,” he explained. “You gotta fight for it, and all my kids have done that.

“They start to believe in themselves. Every time I see them now, I think, that’s all my kids. They seem to achieve more when they get out.

“Twenty eight years,” he added, “and I wouldn’t trade a second for it.”

Just as he had an influence on St. Dominic’s eighth graders, Bob had had a positive impact on the Gaslight District—and for that he deserves a yet another trophy.